Interview +Giveaway with Kathy Logan of The Ruby Brooch

Let’s give a warm welcome to Kathy Logan. She is the author of The Ruby Brooch, a historical time-traveling novel.

Katherine is a distance runner and an avid reader who turned her love of reading into a passion for writing and has completed a sweeping time-travel romance The Ruby Brooch, Book 1 in the Celtic Brooch Trilogy. She is currently working on a contemporary story with a spin off character who demanded his story be told before she completed the other two planned time travels.

A graduate of Rowan University in New Jersey, she earned a BA in Psychology a minor in Criminal Justice. Following graduation, Katherine attended the Philadelphia Institute for Paralegal Training earning a General Practice Certification. She returned to Central Kentucky and worked for twenty years as paralegal. She currently resides in Lexington and writes full time.

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In a sentence or two, please tell us why readers should read your novel.

The Ruby Broochhas an entertaining allure with amazing, non- cardboard characters, great storytelling, and constant action that will keep the reader riding an emotional roller-coaster while either laughing or crying.

Who do you imagine as the reader of your novel?

I’m going to answer with a line from the book. “People like me.” I’m a 62 year old widow and grandmother training for my first marathon. I’m very focused on nutrition, health and fitness. I’m a full-time writer, dating a fantastic man I met on Match.com, and I’m also my ailing mother’s full-time caregiver. In short, a woman who takes care of others, has two full time jobs, is in a relationship, and runs for exercise and health.

I believe that as busy women, we all want a few hours to ourselves to escape from our own worries and concerns and live vicariously through someone else’s troubles with a guaranteed happy ending. I think we’re looking to connect with a strong woman who’s been dealt a bad hand and has the gumption to play it out even though she’s scared to death, and in the midst of her fear, finds her true self. I believe those types of women exist in all genres from time- travels to vampires to regencies. It’s the journey, not necessarily the road. As a reader and as a woman, we want that journey to resonate and in a small way learn something that will make our life fuller and more productive.

How does Celtic mysticism play into The Ruby Brooch?

I’ll share a couple of snippets that aren’t spoilers.

The heroine’s Scottish godfather tells her, “I’ve studied our folklore most of my life, and I believe there are forces in the universe we can’t see or understand. If Sean [the heroine’s father] said this is magical [the ruby brooch], I have no reason not to believe him.” Elliott turned the brooch over and studied the back of the stone. “My grandfather used to say, ‘Some see darkness where others see only the absence of light.’”

Kit drew in a breath. “Meaning?”

Elliott placed the brooch in her hand and curled her fingers around it. “Keep an open mind.”

Later, when she meets the hero they have this exchange. The racing challenge died on the balmy breeze blowing in from the river as they strolled down the rickety sidewalk in silence. By the time they reached the end, the western sky had turned lavender with approaching dusk.

“In Scotland they call the meeting of the day with the night—”

“The gloaming,” the widow [the heroine] said. “Do you believe the time of two-lights is mystical?”

He lifted his eyebrow. “According to Scottish folklore encounters between the visible and invisible worlds occur then.”

“That must be why ghosts sometimes appear at twilight?” Her eyes were as dark and full of mystery as they had been when he first met her.

“And dawn,” he added. “That’s the time of day I saw the lady riding her mighty steed—”

They are interrupted at that point, but Cullen’s childhood vision is very much a part of the story, intertwining the past and present and future, as are Kit’s sightings of Cullen as a ghost that began when she turned 10.

What type of research did you do for the book?

I read dozens of journals written during the Great Migration, a time in our country’s history when women had small voices but indomitable spirits. I talked to experts on topics from carbon dating to rattlesnake bites. I read extensively about the suffragettes; the thoroughbred industry (breeding and racing); genealogy, paramedics; and 19th century legal education, property rights, wines, medicine, childbirth, cooking, oxen, cholera, and dozens of other topics. And, most importantly, I drove the Oregon Trail from Independence, MO, to Portland OR, following mile markers and wagon ruts and talked to people about the land and their family histories. Research, I think, is my favorite part of writing.

What was one of the most interesting data that you stumbled upon?

A week before Christmas 2010, I was researching guns and decided to visit one of our local gun shops. I walked through the front door of a very crowded gun store and stood there not sure where to go. A young man working the cash registered asked if he could help me. I said, “I need a gun that will shoot as many cows in the shortest amount of time.”

The store fell silent. A couple dozen men stared at me like I was crazy. I cleared my throat and explained that I was a romance writer and that my heroine was caught in the middle of a buffalo stampede and needed a weapon. The shock wore off and answers started flying. I still laugh when I think of that visit.

Was there a scene that you absolutely had to have in the book?

I fought (well, disagreed) with editors, dozens of contest judges, and critique partners who nixed the opening of the story. I wanted to show the heroine galloping across the pasture on her thoroughbred. The scene was vividly implanted in my head, and I refused to let it go. Finally, after taking on-line classes, reading, and studying the craft of writing, I slowly began to understand what everyone had tried to tell me. Riding her horse was not where the story action started. It was disappointing to let the scene go, but ultimately I knew it was the right thing to do.

There is a scene about half way through that story that couldn’t be left out. It’s a conversation between the hero and heroine about wearing all sorts of masks to hide who we really are. He asks her who she is down deep inside where no one goes. It was a hard scene to write but one that had to be included.

Quirky Information

Gil Grissom of CSI: Las Vegas or Jethro Gibbs from NCIS?

That one is easy. Jethro is Elliott Fraser, Kit’s godfather.

Captain America or Iron Man?

Captain America – a fish out of water.

If you could be a god/goddess, which one would you be?

Athena: a warrior, protector, working woman, and full of wisdom

Thank you so much for stopping by and doing the interview. Kathy has kindly offered to giveaway an e-book of her novel but first the blurb.

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Blurb from Amazon:
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud
was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. ~Anaïs NinCan a 21st century paramedic find her heart’s desire on the other side of time?
From the white-plank fenced pastures of Lexington, Kentucky, to the beautiful Bay of San Francisco, The Ruby Brooch, a saga steeped in family tradition and mystery, follows a young woman’s journey as she searches for the truth on the other side of the heather-scented mist.As the lone survivor of a car crash that killed her parents, paramedic Kit MacKlenna makes a startling discovery that further alters her life. A faded letter and a well-worn journal reveal that she was abandoned as a baby and the only clues to her identity are a blood-splattered shawl, a locket that bears a portrait of a nineteenth-century man, and a Celtic brooch with mystical powers.
After studying the journal, she decides to continue her father’s twenty-year search for her identity and solve her birth parents’ murders. For safety reasons, she adopts the persona of the Widow MacKlenna. Although a perfect cover for her eccentric behavior, she will be forced to lie and MacKlennas don’t lie, or so she thought. Finally, dressed and packed, she utters the incantation inscribed on the ancient stone and is swept back to Independence, Missouri, in the year 1852.

Upon arriving in the past, she meets Cullen Montgomery, an egotistical Scotsman with a penchant for seducing widows. The San Francisco-bound lawyer happens to resemble the ghost who has haunted Kit since childhood. She quickly finds the Bach-humming, Shakespeare-quoting man to be over-bearing and his intolerance for liars threatens her quest.

If she can survive his accusations and resist his tempting embrace for seventy-three days, she might be able to find the answers she seeks, and return home to a new life without changing history or leaving her heart on the other side of time.

Giveaway Time (International): Winner can win an e-book copy of The Ruby Brooch.
Mandatory Entry: Answer this question; what time period would you like to visit? And leave your e-mail.
—-
Giveaway ends on June 18 at 11:59 PM, midnight.
That’s it. Good luck to all of you.
—-
Kathy Logan can be found at her Blog, WebsiteTwitter, and Facebook
The Ruby Brooch can be bought at Amazon.
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Posted on June 11, 2012, in Interviews and Guest Posts and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 13 Comments.

  1. Persephone, It’s wonderful to be visiting with you and your readers today. Thank you for the opportunity to share a little bit about this story. Kathy

  2. I am very drawn around the Tudor period in England.
    Lauren@mommabearsbookblog
    Lmackesy @ gmail.com

  3. Yellowstone National Park, 200 years ago
    ynpdreamer@gmail.com

  4. Lauren, it seems my knowledge of the Tudor period comes from some great movies like Richard Burton’s Anne of a Thousand Days, and A Man for all Seasons, among others. It is a fascinating time. I’ll have to bone up on my history of England for a planned trip to London next year. Thanks for leaving a comment. Kathy

  5. Peggy, I have never been to Yellowstone National Park. It is on my list of places to see. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Kathy

  6. I would like to visit the 1800s. Around the time Jane Austen was alive.

  7. Filia Oktarina

    I want go to Scotland, when highlander still there.
    Err…. Regency, i think,…. i still confuse about time period,,…ehehehe^^
    filiafantasy at gmail dot com

  8. Filia, the hero in The Ruby Brooch is from the Highlands (early to mid 19th century). He went away to school, then moved to America. Kit’s ancestors are also from the HIghlands. The area plays a significant role in the story. I hope to visit Scotland next year. The area fascinates me. Kathy

  9. Classical Athens – ancient Greece, arguably the greatest ever civilisation – taking in the first original Olympic games.

  10. Joseph Watson

    I would like to visit the future – to see what advances mankind has made (or what a mess we have made of the world we live in.

  11. helenthemadex

    hard to pick just one place so it would be either Rome 1000 years ago or venice 200 years ago

  12. The Sixties. Free love, baby.

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